Changing your personal workflow

I’m working on several projects that have a website component.  I got to thinking …what will it take for you to augment your personal workflow to use a new website on a regular basis?

When I fire up my browser, I have 5 default tabs: personal gmail, work gmail, google calendar, google reader, and tweetlnks.  I’m also test driving some additional websites that could be added to the default list, yammer and google wave.  Then you have regularly used applications  Outlook, Excel, Powerpoint, Putty/Editor, tweetdeck etc.

A new website/service has to have some compelling value for me to use it regularly.  Ideally, the new website/service can integrate (widget/API/firefox plugin) into one of my defaults until the I see enough value so that is top of mind for me to visit regularly or to make it a default.

Some examples: I really like RememberTheMilk, but the gmail integration wasn’t great and it couldn’t dethrone outlook tasks and gmail stars.
Collecta is a great search engine, but I haven’t seen the value yet.  I’ve tested it and liked what I saw, I just don’t want to spend time doing another search just to see if I’m missing something.
My twitter usage was sporadic until I hit a tipping-point (I can’t believe I used the term) and now it’s one of my defaults.

Bing could be an interesting case study for this.  It has grown market share, but at the expense of Yahoo, not Google. See here Bing increased it’s market share as a result of marketing and users taking it for a test drive.  But now the growth has slowed as the buzz has worn off and we find the results aren’t all the different.  See my app to compare.  How many more users will change their default search from google to bing?

How many websites do you visit on a regular basis?
What have you added to your “regular/default” list?  Why? What was the hurdle that changed your workflow?

A little PR for @myflightinfo

A little PR goes a long long way for @myflightinfo

I launched the bot during the first week of January this year.  Actually, it was a few days before the Miracle on the Hudson event.  So, I decided to hold off on the marketing.

I was marketing the bot to those I though would find it useful.  I would keep a search column open for “flight status” on Tweetdeck and when a tweet matched, I would review and send a reply if it made sense.  This was simple, easy and non-intrusive.  But I knew it wasn’t going to garner the followers to make it into a successful product.

On Monday Feb. 9, a tweet went out from @mashable linking to a post by @iElliott on productivity with twitter.
Update: I did not approach @mashable or @iElliott for a plug.  I assume they found it to be useful and wanted to share it with their readers.

@mashable tweet
@mashable tweet

This started the flow of followers.  Before the tweet, there were about 12 followers; 24 hours later, 270.  It was mad rush in the first few hours and has slowed to a trickle now.  (I will see if can plot the follower flow) The majority of followers is in the US, which is good, cause the product mostly supports US and large international airlines.

map of @myflightinfo
map of @myflightinfo

Now the hard part of delivering what the followers want – a simple and useful product.

I have lots of ideas about how to make it better, but I’d like to incorporate what the users want.

If you have any comments/questions/suggestions please send to @myflightinfo or to me at my personal account @lmai

Don’t forget to check your flight status with @myflightinfo !!
You can get your own map of followers at http://www.ironmonkeyventures.com/mapmytweeps

TweetLnks.com – Links in your Twitter Feed

There are many Twitter webapps that show you the most popular items (links, hashtags, profiles etc). What’s missing are these tools for MY network.

Twitter has become a social bookmarking/discovery tool for me.  I really on all my friends to let me know what they find interesting.  I needed a simple way to see what new links are out there.

TweetLnks.com started as a personal project to look at all the links in my twitter feed.  Then @ceonyc asked if anyone knew of such a tool.  So a little sprucing up and some additional functionality and it’s ready for public use.  I’ll visit this webapp after a period of not using twitter to see what kind of links are interesting.

TweetLnks.com analyzes the tweets of your friends to see what URLs your friends are talking about.  In my network of friends, 4 tweets were made about the CNBC boycott.

Give it a try and let me know your thoughts @lmai

 Screenshot of Tweetlnks.com
Screenshot of Tweetlnks.com

@myflightinfo takes off

I was traveling quite a bit for work, and there was no easy way to check my flight status.  The blackberry browser does not work with most airline and flight info service websites.
The last thing I need to do is sign up for more alerts and services.

So I wrote this twitter bot that will reply with my flight status.
It’s fast, free, and simple.

1.  Follow @myflightinfo and wait for a follow back.
2.  Send your flight information in a message.  Like this “d myflightinfo co101”.
3.  Within a minute, you should get a direct message back with your status.

myflightinfo_screenshot1

The data comes from Flightstats.com

The next iteration of network mapping

After completing MapMyTweeps, I started looking into next “degree” of mapping my network (friends of friends, friends’ followers etc) to look for any interesting information.

Here is my first rendering of my Twitter network.  It maps my first 100 followers, for each of my followers it maps 3 of their followers, and then one more iteration.  The size and complexity grow too quickly for me to get any useful information.  Plus it takes forever.

I think I’m going about this the wrong way.  I need a question or a hypothesis and then see if I can answer using social network mapping.

@Stocktwits and @Shakeshack maps

Here are two well-known (at least based on my friends both on twitter and my off-line friends) brands.

Both @StockTwits and @Shakeshack auto-follow, so it’s a good example of the mapping of their respective followers.

stocktwits map
@stocktwits – strong US following, especially along the East Coast and a good showing in Europe.

shakeshack
@shakeshack – very similar to @stocktwits in the US and Europe, non in South America but 3 in Australia.

I will revisit these maps in 1 months time to see the differences.

Map your twitter following and friends at http://www.ironmonkeyventures.com/mashup/mapmytweeps.php

Map My Tweeps

Here is my map of my twitter follower and friends

Check out the map of my tweeps.

Map My Tweeps for Lmai US

I’m very concentrated in the US as you can see.
The next photo shows more detail of my follwers and the people I follow.

Map My Tweeps for Lmai US

There’s obvious concentration on the East and West coasts, but there’s an interesting bunching in the Atlanta, Georgia area.

Map your following or friends at http://www.ironmonkeyventures.com/mashup/mapmytweeps.php

Beta Launch of MapMyTweeps

I was interested in seeing the geographical diversity of my Twitter friends and followers.

I finally found this Yahoo Pipe by Andy M called Twitter Friends, but it wasn’t everything I was looking for.

I wanted to combine both on a single map with different colors and also show mutual following relationships.  Google maps provided that flexibility.

Check it out and let me know your thoughts.

MapMyTweeps

Feel free to share them with me.  I would love to see some interesting maps from brands.  You can email them to me at info at ironmonkeyventures.com

Map My Tweeps Examples

Here are two well-known (at least based on my friends both on twitter and my off-line friends) brands.

Both @StockTwits and @Shakeshack auto-follow, so it’s a good example of the mapping of their respective followers.

stocktwits map
@stocktwits – strong US following, especially along the East Coast and a good showing in Europe.

shakeshack
@shakeshack – very similar to @stocktwits in the US and Europe, non in South America but 3 in Australia.

I will revisit these maps in 1 months time to see the differences.